Public Relations: Core Messaging

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A new weekly blog will hit these pages about public relations. In the not-to-distant future, navigation to this, and other postings on RunningAaron, will be organized by topic for easy navigation

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Core messaging as it relates to public relations is exactly what you’d expect it to be. That’s the nature most topics in public relations. Whatever the title of your subject within PR is, the chances are great that by applying common sense you’ll easily grasp the intended understanding. So let’s apply some common sense to the term “Core Messaging”

Core: according to Merriam-Webster 

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“Core.” Merriam-Webster.com. Merriam-Webster, n.d. Web. 25 Apr. 2014.

Okay, so I don’t know if that helped or hurt my case, but let’s continue. The key take-away from that definition is “a central and often foundational part.”

Message: according to Merriam-Webster 

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“Message.” Merriam-Webster.com. Merriam-Webster, n.d. Web. 25 Apr. 2014.

 

Key take-away is “a piece of information that is sent or given to someone” 

So let’s put these together: Core Messaging is “a central and often foundational part,” + “that is sent or given to someone.” 

So now we know what it is, what do we do? The answer is to keep it simple. No matter what your business is there is a simple core message just waiting to be delivered.

Here is an excellent graphic on slideshare titled Simplifying Messages from copywriteink.com. The lesson here is when constructing your core message, consider the environment, find the contrasts, and “realize that not everyone is your customer, and that’s okay.”

Best practices would see a team brainstorming the task of developing the core message. Once in place, the core message will be your reliable waypoint to determine if you’re on track with the rest of your planning. 

 

 

Aaron Porter
amanporter@gmail.com
@AaronWPorter
https://runningaaron.wordpress.com/

 

 

 

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